NBA / Jan 14, 2010 / 11:00 am

Dwyane Wade: The New Mike

On the basketball court and in the corporate arena, Dwyane Wade‘s potential appears limitless. As the perennial MVP candidate and newest Air Jordan pitchman confronts off-court distractions and constant speculation about his future, he’s not close to giving up his spot on the medal stand as one of the undisputed top three players in the game.

Earlier this season, Wade posed for the cover of Dime #54 (on newsstands now) and sat down to interview for this story.

NO CEILINGS

Somewhere along the way, Dwyane Wade went Hollywood.

But not in that big-headed, “Don’t you know who I am?” insufferable diva kind of way. No, six years since he entered the VIP room that is the NBA — with a championship and Finals MVP and Olympic gold medal and League scoring title and tens of millions in salary and endorsements under his belt — D-Wade is still the same surprisingly humble guy he was when he came out of Marquette via Chicago, when he introduced us to a young husband and father just trying to give his family a better life. The ultimate embodiment of the American Dream realized through this sport we love.

Rather, D-Wade has gone Hollywood in the sense that he knows The Show must always go on. He’s come through personal adversity to develop a shell of concentration. Despite any negatives in his life, despite any perceived distractions, Wade can put on his armor and perform at a level higher than just about any basketball player in the world.

“All that stuff people were talking about in the offseason, D-Wade did a great job of putting it to bed this summer to focus on the season,” says Miami Heat teammate Jermaine O’Neal. “He’s shown a lot of maturity, especially for a guy that’s been in the League only six years. I knew him from playing against him in Indiana and on the All-Star team, but I didn’t know him to the level I do now. His focus is incredible.”

It’s an early-November afternoon in Miami, typically sunny and seductive around the city. In a clandestine gathering of media, sneaker executives, security and two of the NBA’s definitive athletes over the past 25 years, Wade is the center of attention at the launch of the Air Jordan 2010. The night before, he dropped 41 points on the Wizards — and later tonight he will give the Cavaliers 36 points and one of the highlights of the season with his dunk on Anderson Varejao. (Look it up.) For now, Wade takes the stage alongside Michael Jordan to talk about the newest release in the sneaker game’s iconic line.

Here, Wade is at ease.

He tells jokes that, told years ago, would’ve landed him on blast in MJ’s Hall of Fame speech. (“I think Mike retired the year before I came in the League … strategically,” Wade says with a grin while everyone laughs.) Stepping in front of Dime’s camera lens to shoot his fourth cover for the magazine, he is all smiles. But like an experienced actor/model, he can throw on expressions on command: the ice grill, the intense look, the pensive look, the Thinking Man look. Without prompt, he even gives a “blue steel” Zoolander face to draw more laughs.

Seeing him like this — crisp tailored gray suit, hairline so tight it would make Steve Harvey cry, diamond earring and salesman’s demeanor ready at the snap of a finger — you’d never know D-Wade’s life was so complicated. You would never know he’s been recently involved in a messy divorce with the mother of his two children, or in a pair of lawsuits with a former business partner. You’d never know that he is possibly playing his final season in the only professional home he’s ever known. You’d never know that part. And that’s exactly how he’d prefer it.

“I would like to say I’ve grown up a lot,” Wade says, asked to go back to 2006, when his fame initially exploded following his first NBA championship. “You know, a lot of things in my life have changed from 2006 going into 2010. There’s a lot of things that make you grow up. There’s a lot of changes in life, my kids get older — I’ve had another son since 2006 — so just a lot of different things.”

(photo. Jeffery Salter)

One of the most overused words in sports is “distraction,” but in Wade’s case, it’s a question that needs to be asked. Last season he played through distractions well enough to average a League-leading 30.2 points per game, along with 7.5 assists, 5.0 rebounds, 2.2 steals and 1.3 blocks, finishing third in MVP and Defensive Player of the Year voting, respectively. This season, at the time we got up with Wade, the Heat had one of the best records in the NBA through the first three weeks of the schedule and Wade ranked second in the League in scoring.

“You know, I deal with [the free agency questions] when I come to the arena, but outside of that I really don’t,” Wade says. “I understand that it’s exciting for fans. I understand that it’s a big story and I play into the story sometimes, and sometimes I don’t. So I like to have a little fun with it.”

Fun like later that night at American Airlines Arena. With fellow 2010 free agent and close friend LeBron James on the court with Wade — and Jordan and Scottie Pippen just happening to be in the stands — one couldn’t help but envision a future with Wade and LeBron playing together. Otherwise, conventional wisdom says Wade’s options break down like this: Stay in Miami and carry his own team, go to New York and become an even brighter star, or go home to Chicago and fulfill the prophecy set when he donned a Jordan jersey for his Dime #13 cover shoot in 2004 and signed with Jordan’s imprint earlier this year.

“If things go the way I want — and I’ve said it from day one — I want to be in Miami,” Wade says. “I want to make sure that we can continue to add to our team and I hope Miami is the main attraction city of next summer. I hope a lot of people want to come down here. But at the same time, I’m gonna take my time with LeBron, with (2010 free agent) Joe Johnson. All of us are going to sit around a table together and chop it up and see what guys are thinking and what guys are doing. Ideally for me, everybody wants to come to Miami. That would be ideal. And we could have that option.”

Rank these four in order of preference: Winning, money, location, and mass appeal.

“Well, winning is one,” Wade says. “There’s no question about it. Location might be number two. For me, mass appeal. And then money is last.”

*** *** ***

Money.

If our fantasies about celebrities are anywhere near true, Dwyane Wade is swimming in it like Uncle Scrooge. He’s flicking it around in the sky like Lil Wayne. He’s having it hauled into the bank in body-sized sacks like Tony Montana.

Wade will earn a little more than $15.7 million this season in NBA salary, plus a few extra million from his endorsement deals with Jordan Brand, T-Mobile, Gatorade and Lincoln vehicles, among others.

The path has been moving as quickly as a movie montage for D-Wade, from the South Side of Chicago to sitting out his first year in college to get his grades straight, to becoming a superstar on the court and an icon off it. The money is the easy part; the fame is a whole other monster. Along the way he’s learned what Jordan and Kobe and A-Rod and De La Hoya had to learn: how to tune everything else out and focus on the business of winning.

“You know what? It’s actually gone better than I thought it would. You never know how your career can go,” Wade says. “When we think of our career real close, we all think of success and we think of winning. Even the downfalls I’ve had have made success and winning that much better. And there’s a lot of things in the process that have made it great. I wouldn’t change it. You know, from winning a championship to winning 15 games or whatever it may be, all that has made me the person that I am and I’ve learned from all of it.”

Finding focus was easy just a year ago. In the summer of 2008, Wade had something to prove. Coming off two injury-plagued seasons — including the aforementioned 15-win, 67-loss debacle — his status as one of the game’s elite was suddenly in doubt. New stars like Chris Paul and Dwight Howard and Brandon Roy had risen to prominence, and Wade’s ’06 title seemed like a long time ago. Facing legions of doubters, not to mention a troublesome knee and shoulder, he enlisted the NBA’s foremost trainer, Tim Grover, to help rebuild his body. He got back in shape, and had his rebirth at the 2008 Olympics while helping lead Team USA to a gold medal. He followed it up with last season’s run that included a return to the playoffs and a return to the royal class alongside Kobe, LeBron, Dwight and the rest.

(photo. Jeffery Salter)

Wade had motivation to workout like a madman then. But what about now? What would push him in ’09 to make 2010 another memorable one?

“Like every summer, you approach it to get better,” Wade says. “This summer I didn’t have to rebuild my body because I wasn’t coming off an injury, but I still worked on assets of my game that I wanted to bring into this year — my post game, more of my mid-range game, my three-point shooting. To get better. And I continued to strengthen my body, so it was actually better this summer because I was able to build off of what I did last summer. Continue to fine-tune the parts of my game, but also to make sure that this year I’m even stronger for my body to be able to take on an 82-game season plus playoffs and hopefully don’t break down. So just continue to keep building your body stronger.”

*** *** ***

The last time I saw Dwyane Wade before this, he was being screamed at by teenagers and elementary-school kids, gawked at by grown men and women, and pulled in four or five different directions by an ever-present team of handlers. That was during All-Star Weekend in Phoenix, for a T-Mobile event at the NBA’s Jam Session fan fest.

Wade was supposed to have about 10 minutes beforehand to do a one-on-one interview. Maybe four minutes in, he was being whisked away by people in suits into the delirious crowd, even having to shout his last answer to me over his shoulder.

Not much has changed. At the Jordan Brand launch, Wade is being pulled in more directions than he has limbs. Somebody over here wants an interview; somebody over there wants a photo; somebody needs him for this; somebody needs him for that. Everything is on the move, each stop timed to the second. Being able to stand still and not talk for a few moments is a rare gift.

Wade is the newest and perhaps most high-profile member of the Jordan team, one that includes Derek Jeter, Carmelo Anthony and Chris Paul. Acquired from the Converse imprint that he carried for years, Wade was, like every Jordan endorser, hand-picked by MJ himself. He is also the first pitchman other than MJ chosen to be the face of the actual Air Jordan sneaker. He will debut the 2010’s on the court at All-Star Weekend in Dallas — the city where he won his championship and Finals MVP in ’06 and set the wheels in motion for this coronation.

“I really don’t look at it like becoming the face of the brand with so many guys that have been here before me — especially Chris and ‘Melo and Derek,” Wade says. “I just want to come and add to the brand. It’s an unbelievable honor for me and I’m excited. This is one of the biggest accomplishments in my life to be able to see Michael say, ‘I want him in my brand.’ It’s really amazing.”

And why shouldn’t he be the chosen one? While Kobe seems to have taken ownership of the “Closest thing to Mike since Mike” title, Wade may be the more accurate depiction of Air. It begins with the Chicago connection, but extends to an on-court style that is more explosive than smooth, even lacking that deadly jumper, akin to Mike’s early work. Then you look at Wade’s role on the Miami Heat. Like Jordan’s pre-title days, Wade, 27, has a supporting cast generally considered not good enough to put him in position to carry them all the way. Like Mike once did, Wade is doing it all in a way other superstars in the League don’t have to.

“You can’t stop him,” says Knicks assistant Herb Williams, who played in the League during the reigns of Jordan, Magic, Bird and Isiah. “The only thing you can do is keep him off the free throw line as much as possible. If he’s making his jump shot, he’s impossible to stop. You got to hope he’s missing his shot and try to guard him with more than one guy … You have to get the whole team to guard him.”

Ronnie Brewer, defensive stopper of the Utah Jazz and the man charged with guarding the Wades, Kobes, B-Roys and Ginobilis of the League, saw Wade go off for 50 on him late last season in a triple-overtime thriller. “I think he improves his game every year,” Brewer says. “He can get to the basket at will and finish at the rim. But he keeps getting better at shooting, three-point shooting, two-dribble pull-ups, post-up game. He’s a good rebounder, good passer and good defender, so he’s got a lot of things going for him. When you have to guard him you have to prepare yourself for a long game because he can do so many things well.”

Brewer is right. This D-Wade is not the one we’ve seen in years past.

“I’ve taken more of a leadership role now,” Wade says. “I’m better on the defensive end of the floor, and I understand more that my team needs me to assert myself defensively. In 2006, I didn’t have to stick the other team’s best player, I just did the offensive stuff. So now I think I’m a more complete player.”

O’Neal, a six-time All-Star center who was traded to Miami in the middle of last season, sees the changes.

“Sometimes guys in the League have a hard time when another player comes in, thinking he might demand more touches or demand a different style of play,” says O’Neal. “It was never like that with D-Wade. His first words to me were, ‘I’m glad you’re here.’ My first words were, ‘I’m glad to be here.’ We know that we need each other to win a championship. I’m trying to get one, and he’s trying to get another one.”

(photo. Jeffery Salter)

*** *** ***

In sports, a championship is the ultimate elixir. Reputations can change, personality clashes can disappear, tensions can dissipate. D-Wade never had to deal with the, “Can he win the big one?” phase, unlike Kevin Garnett and Steve Nash and Tracy McGrady. He’s certified in that respect. At the same time, he won his title three, going on four years ago, and his team hasn’t seriously contended for a chip since then. Ask Kobe: Put a long enough gap between rings, and people start to forget things.

“That title (in ’06) is always gonna count, no matter what no one says,” Wade says. “But there’s always going to be a ‘What have you done for me lately?’ mentality for the world. That’s just the world we live in.

“I think for me, until other guys like LeBron and Carmelo, if them guys win a ring, then it’s really gonna be like, ‘Alright, D it’s really your turn again.’ I think what I’ve done by winning one so far, kind of taken that off me, I’m still good. But no one wants to win a ring more than me. I expect they build a team around me that we can do that, and if we do that then we’ll have the opportunity.”

With each game — with each day — the pressure mounts.

Pressure on the Heat as an organization to prove to Wade that this is where he should be for the long-term. Pressure on Wade to prove he’s worthy of all the courtship certain to come his way next summer. Pressure on everyone to prove it’s all worth it: The distractions, the money, the hours, the sacrifice.

“He’s been a professional throughout the whole thing,” says teammate Udonis Haslem. “Whatever situations come up off the court, D always does a good job separating the two. I commend him for that, because a lot of times it’s hard for guys to separate those things.”

Haslem has seen Wade grow up. He was on the Heat in 2003 when Wade came in looking to make a mark, and he’s seen Wade tattoo his presence on the sports world’s consciousness. Looking back on his first days as a professional, maybe Wade didn’t see a man who would someday attain the balance of ice-cold focus and fiery work ethic done famously by idols like Jordan. Maybe he did. Back then he was just looking to survive in this new world.

“My goal was just to make a statement,” Wade says. “You know, to first of all play the game and to finally get to live my lifelong dream out. But also to go in there and make a statement and let it be known that I should be a top player in this League and I’m gonna go in there and prove it.

“I wanna say that the foundation of what I am will never change and will always be the same,” he goes on. “For me to say that things haven’t changed in my life, the way I approach things, it has. You know, because of the fame and because of the world that we live in today — the Internet world — there’s a lot of things you have to do to live your life differently.”

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  • control

    For the pictures of Wade, did the photographer talk like “Dwayne, lets see…your face when your dog died, great! Ok now, your wife was murdered and you found her body, wait, too much happiness! It was your mom murdered! Ok now, imagine Zach Randolph is being traded to your team, or you are being traded to the Clippers. Great, that’s the depression I want to see!”.

    Tell that fucker to cheer up some, looks like he just got punched in the face a few times and is trying not to cry.

  • Diggity Dave

    Wade would be a brighter star in New York? Based on what exactly? Once again, Dime prefers to go homer and show zero journalistic objectivity.

  • http://www.dimemag.com Patrick Cassidy

    @Diggity Dave –

    No homers for New York here. Not one member of the editorial staff is from New York or New Jersey.

    – PC

  • Diggity Dave

    Duly noted. Could someone elaborate on how playing in NY would make him a brighter star? The Knicks aren’t what they used to be, not even close, and I for one don’t think they hold that same mystique and allure.

  • http://www.dimemag.com Aron Phillips

    @Diggity Dave

    Wade is already the third best player in the NBA, so he’ll be a bright star wherever he plays. But you have to understand, from a marketing standpoint, that markets such as New York City, Los Angeles and even Chicago and Houston to a lesser extent are where the $$$ is. In terms of population, here’s how it breaks down:

    1. NYC has 8,363,710 people
    2. LA has 3,833,995 people
    3. Chicago has 2,853,114 people
    4. Houston has 2,242,193 people

    Miami? Try #43 at 413,201 people

  • control

    Aron

    You forgot Toronto at 5.5 Million (Greater Toronto area) and only 30 million Canadians cheering for the Raps…wouldn’t expect you to actually think they are anything but some ice cold wasteland city up north though.

  • http://dimemag.com Austin Burton

    To add on to what Aron said, it’s the Madison Avenue factor with NYC. If Wade played for the Knicks right now, the personal stuff he’s going through described in the story would be a much bigger story nationally, because there’s so much more media in NY and they’re so much more zealous about their stars. (Think of how everything A-Rod does becomes national news.) Why do you think Eddy Curry is a national joke while Sean May isn’t so much; because Curry plays for NY. Why was the Marbury drama so big nationally while nobody ever talked about Jamaal Tinsley? Because Steph played for NY.

  • Ian

    aron
    third?
    i dont know he can be argued anywhere from 1-4 imo with kobe , bron and that old man thats supposed to be declining in san ant.

  • http://twitter.com/PoppiGEE POPPI GEE

    Yea I think actions shots with Wade are better pictures. Personally he comes off fruity when he is trying to model and be G.Q.

    Let him dunk the ball or show him doing something that standing there looking like choir director.

    DIME how about an article be it on line or in the mag about the discrepancy in talent at HBCU’s and other colleges in regards to basketball. I mean even though your Alabama States and Hamptons of the world make the March Madness tourney, it’s sad to many degrees that these smaller schools can’t get bigger talent.

    I heard a long time ago it was supposed to be a movie about it coming out where the talent opted to go to smaller schools instead making them a powerhouse. I guess it got canned or on the shelf.

    Anyway just a request.

    Get Wade in some actions shots lol!

  • Alee-Mo

    Awesome article. Wade is the man.

  • http://twitter.com/PoppiGEE POPPI GEE

    Ian has a point. Perhaps 3 -5 needs to be revisited with Duncan, Dirk, Durant (dang “D” names can play) and Dwayne (I know someone will be left at 6 lol).

    I just don’t know if you can give Wade that 3rd spot like that. Oh don’t forget Darmello lol.

  • Ian

    poppi
    my top 5 are
    not in order

    bron
    wade
    kobe
    td
    dirk

    with melo and durant in my top 10-12 so we ara kinda on the same page

  • http://www.dimemag.com Aron Phillips

    @control

    You are correct, I omitted them purposely, because it’s in no star’s best interest to play “overseas.” That’s why no matter how much they’d pay him, MJ, Kobe, etc. wouldn’t play in Europe, why David Beckham plays in LA and why your lovely Canada traded Wayne Gretzky to LA (despite hockey being the national sport).

  • http://twitter.com/PoppiGEE POPPI GEE

    Ian my top 5 are (in order).

    Kobe
    LeBron
    Duncan
    Wade
    Melo
    (but Durant is fasssst on Melo’s heels).

  • Ian

    melo and durant over dirk? well i think the top 4 is kinda easy to pick.

    so many things have flipped my top 4 the last three seasons it stared with 07 title duncan wade bron kobe then it went to 08 kobe loss in finals and wades injury bron duncan kobe wade after with the 09 title it went to kobe bron wade duncan and now this season its kobe/duncan tied followed by bron then wade. at least is the same 4 dudes trading places.

  • Ian

    no idea if you understood that mess hehehe let me clean it up a bit

    07 spurs title
    top 4
    duncan
    wade (06 title)
    bron carried team to finals
    kobe didnt take the lakers anywhere

    08 lakers lose finals
    top 4
    bron
    kobe
    duncan
    wade

    09 lakers win and us wins gold spurs lose in first round
    kobe
    bron
    wade
    duncan

    this year
    td leaps over wade and bron
    kobe/td tied
    bron
    wade

    and that shit will continue to change

  • control

    Aron

    Come on, the examples you use are really weak. David Beckham is playing in Italy right now (did he even play more than a few games in LA)? He’s getting paid by LA but he sure as fuck ain’t playing there.

    Also, you are making it seem like Gretzky WANTED to go to LA. I was living in Calgary when he was traded so I was like first row seats to that shit, Gretzky didn’t WANT to go to LA, and there were several teams in the running when that happened. You do know that Canada isn’t a city, it’s a country and that it was Edmonton that traded Gretzky, not the country of Canada?

    Both of those examples are pretty weak considering this is a basketball site and we are talking about completely different sports entirely. Money is Money, and it’s not like American money is so much better than Canadian money (even though all salaries are paid US). The main reason why most ‘stars’ won’t sign in Canada has nothing to do with it being ‘overseas’ but because the Raptors have been a mediocre and VERY soft team for the most part the entire time they have been around.

    Outside of Antonio Davis, I can’t think of a single player who was like “the city of Toronto sucks, fuck this shit” and Davis said something along those lines because his wife is a stupid cunt who didn’t want their kids to learn that evil metric system.

  • http://twitter.com/PoppiGEE POPPI GEE

    Oh wait I forget about Dirk that quick. Ok revisited.

    Kobe
    LeBron
    TD
    Wade
    Dirk

    then Melo and Durant lol

  • Diggity Dave

    @Austin

    Eddy Curry is bigger news because he’s getting paid a fortune compared to Sean May. Instead of saying Wade would be a brighter star, I would say that perhaps the scrutinizing media spotlight shines brighter in NY. As for being a better known star, I completely disagree. In this day and age, it doesn’t make a difference, and the media driven fan-based All Star vote totals are a fine example. Wade could play in Fleaprick, KY and he’d still be world famous.

  • http://dimemag.com Austin Burton

    OK, I’ll go at it this way: Why is John Starks more recognizable/famous than Vernon Maxwell? Look up their numbers and you’ll see they were almost identical. Mad Max even won a championship where Starks didn’t, Max went to a bigger-name college, and he had more “controversy” potential than Starks. But because Starks played for the Knicks, he’s more famous.

    If the Knicks are doing bad, they’re a national punchline. If they’re doing good, they’re on national TV every week. You’re right in the sense that Wade would be a star anywhere — and I’ve even written before that Miami isn’t THAT far off NY in terms of mass appeal — but NY is still #1, with L.A. in the discussion as well.

  • BiG ShoT BoB

    No way in hell Dirk soft ass is in the top 5.

    (In Order)

    Kobe
    Lebron
    Wade
    Duncan
    Garnett

  • control

    BSB

    Garnett is top 5 now? Are you thinking this is like 1998 or something? WHEN he is playing, he’s sometimes not even the best guy on his team…

    I’d put at least Nash, Chris Paul, Deron Williams, Dwight Howard and Chris Bosh ahead of KG, just to name a few.

  • BiG ShoT BoB

    You put KG on any team in the league and they instantly become contenders…you can’t say that about any of those other players mentioned except maybe Dwight and I’d put him at #6 only because his post game isn’t complete yet but once it is he’ll jump to #4 or 5.

  • control

    BSB

    By your logic, the Timbos were contenders for 10 years? That is when KG was in his prime, and not losing a step like he is now…

  • BiG ShoT BoB

    Yup they were with Sprewell and Sam.

  • BiG ShoT BoB

    Celts with KG = championship

    Celts without KG = no championship

    KG = best player on Celts

  • control

    BSB

    I could disqualify everyone on your list except Duncan using your logic.

    Kobe doesn’t have any championships without Shaq or Pau.
    Wade doesn’t have a championship without Shaq or the refs.
    LeBron doesn’t have any championships.
    Duncan is just a beast, probably solid enough to win a chip or two as long as he had good role players.

    You put KG on Memphis, they ain’t contenders, same as if you put him back on the Wolves, or on the Nets. Your logic is flawed and your expectations of KG are outdated. The guy was top 5 player no doubt, but he ain’t there now.

    You can add Melo, KD, maybe even Pau and a few others to that list above KG. Ain’t no one take KG over those guys if they want a chip today…

  • control

    BSB

    I DO agree with you as far as KG being best player on the Celts though. PP is overrated, Rondo is the worst shooter in the NBA (and overrated too, kid ain’t that good), guys like Perks and Glenn Davis are garbage and RayRay has shown his age more than any of the other big 3 lately.

    All I’m saying is there are people who will argue and say that KG isn’t best guy on his team. Ain’t no one that will do that (who has their sanity anyways) about some of the other players I have mentioned.

  • Diggity Dave

    @Austin

    I get what you’re saying, and perhaps I mistook is for a selling point. I would think something like that would scare away a star player. Who wants every iota of their dirty laundry amplified 100x because of their location? If the Knicks were still as revered as the Yankees are, it would probably help. As it stands, I think it’ll take a good decade of solid basketball and wise basketball decision making by the Knicks brass to repair their mangled reputation.

    “Brighter Star” is a bit misleading, but I understand your point of view.

  • Bizz

    @ control…100% ACCURATE. Aron needs to get his head out of his ass when it comes to reporting what he “knows” about the city of Toronto. If it’s a matter of “overseas”, then every world class player in soccer would play in the MLS, instead of being a has-been moving over to the States like Beckham. He came to the U.S. because nobody in Europe wanted to pay him for being washed up at the time. If there was a reason why players don’t want to play in Toronto, it’s 90% a tax factor and a 10% climate factor, not a matter of not being popular enough. The city itself is considered one of the best cities in North America if not the world, and athletes LOVE coming to Toronto.

  • http://dimemag.com Austin Burton

    @Bizz — However, since most of the world-class soccer players are from Europe, “overseas” for them would be the MLS.

  • BiG ShoT BoB

    @Control:

    So let me get this straight:

    KG, Oj Mayo, Rudy Gay = not contender

    KG, Kevin Love, Al Jeff, Johnny Flynn = not contender

    KG, Devin Harris, Brook Lopez = N.C.

    GTFOH your hate for KG and the Celts in general blinds your good judgment. If Duncan is top 5 still so is Garnett….

  • Ian

    control agree with u 100%
    bsb said any team with garnett is a contender and used only one season of his timberwolves career. now i ask for real anyone thought kg was beating the lakers or spurs that season??? hell no.

    bsb
    td and kg both in their primes is td easy td and garnett today is even easier. kg is not top ten today thats like sayin tmac is a top ten player.

    so kj oj mayo and gay are contenders???? where?? in th nbdl you must be kidding?? this is what you guys call sarcasm?

  • Ian

    and the nj team lol so garnett takes a 3 win team and makes them contenders?

  • BiG ShoT BoB

    Well maybe I went to far with NJ but you guys are arguing over what 3 teams in the league. That just proves how good KG is. He changes the culture on whatever team he plays for plain and simple. In fact he was just DPOY the year before last. When’s the last time Duncan won an award?

  • http://www.305hiphop.com JJ

    y would he leave miami to go to a horrible team just because of there stadium ..he is staying in miami bringing either king james or bosh and joe johnson..i hate all you miami haters face it wade is staying he is the dan marino of basketball….

  • CV

    C’mon man. do you think duncan is the best because he has the championships and stuff? try it the other way man, give duncan to the heat and dwade to the spurs. in the same year that they won a chamionship. do you think san antonio role players didn’t help that much. then why do you think parker had a finals mvp? and to let you know, duncan did enter san antonio while they were still a contender. he was with fellow big man david robinson. when he won titles, did he even do it without tony parker & manu ginobli? what about miami and dwade? dwade led the heat to a playoff appearance on his first year! who was there with him then? odom? butler? alston? haslem? how did they match up with other guys those years? give the man some love. and here’s the catch. who, in the NBA’s 50+ years had ever made 2000+ pts 1500+ assists 500+ rebs 100+ steals and 100+ blocks in a single season. and to think, it’s dwyane wade who is just 6’4″. he’s definitely one of the best. even bron who’s 6’8″ and as they say the most athletic player who ever played the game hasn’t done that up until his 5th year in the NBA. i say it’s stupid to remove him off the best players list.

  • Malc

    GREAT article…Wade is the man!! Hopefully bron and all his pictur taking dancing antcis will land em a chip!! Whle the heat build bac a team so all this top 5 order nonsense can be put to rest!! DWADE GETS IT DONE HANDS DOWN!! And if he had help you would see the REAL WADE!! he gets it done barely any!! Kobe Melo bronTD KG ALL HAVE HELP!!! But MIA will be back n then EEEVVRRYYYBODY WILL BE BACK ON THE BANDWAGON SINGIN HIS PRAISES WITH THE TOP 5 order trash!! DWADE ALL DAY!!!

  • MalcDavis415

    GREAT article…Wade is the man!! Hopefully bron and all his pictur taking dancing antcis will land em a chip!! Whle the heat build bac a team so all this top 5 order nonsense can be put to rest!! DWADE GETS IT DONE HANDS DOWN!! And if he had help you would see the REAL WADE!! he gets it done barely any!! Kobe Melo bronTD KG ALL HAVE HELP!!! But MIA will be back n then EEEVVRRYYYBODY WILL BE BACK ON THE BANDWAGON SINGIN HIS PRAISES WITH THE TOP 5 order trash!! DWADE ALL DAY!!!

  • Brian

    okay first of all. WADE is the MAN!!! He is so underrated. people were so looking down on him when he was going through injuries and all. How is he not top 3?! 2000+ pts 1500+ assists 500+ rebs 100+ steals and 100+ blocks in a single season. THATS RIDICULOUS!!!! hes showing that hes better then all the other players out there. it’s dwyane Wade Kobe then Lebron. Lebron and kobe have so much talent around them and Wade doesnt. if wade played for either of those two teams his stats would be better. Duncan is great but no hes not top 4 the past couple years. hes a great player. he puts up 19 and 10 all the time but to me chris paul is number 4. then carmelo and durant. Lebron doesnt have a ring and hes had more talent around him. Wade was team Redeem. he did work!! Lebron for all the bandwagon jumpers he has and as talented as he is cant win a ring!!! thats so garbage hes overrated. wade is better and so is Kobe. i hope he stays in Miami. WADE all the way!!!

  • Franchize

    Are u kidding no talk about CP3 or how about Dwight they are both better then Duncan