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NBA / Sep 18, 2012 / 12:00 pm

The 10 NBA Coaches Most Likely To Face Off With Another Coach

photo. Rocky Mountain News

The life cycle of Tom Coughlin and Greg Schiano‘s midfield  feud Sunday over what is proper NFL end-game etiquette is just about over now. We’ve heard the defenses and the accusations and hashed out what exactly count as unwritten rules in football. The rarity of coaches tossing jabs at each other — I can think of just Jim Harbaugh vs. Jim Schwartz and Pete Carroll blasting Mike Bellotti — is still too good to let go entirely, though. Mostly, the idea naturally made its ways over to basketball. With coaches just a midcourt table away it’s surprising more dust-ups haven’t been public. Choosing who would be the most likely to pull a Schiano vs. Coughlin isn’t an exact science, because while you can discount a bloc of coaches whose sideline demeanors represent varying states of being awake — looking at you, Terry Stotts, Rick Adelman and Larry Drew — there are very few Bobby Knights at the spectrum’s other end, either. A milquetoast coach is a beat writer’s dream come true, but it won’t do here. It’s not a knock on the coaches’ competitiveness, but how they express it.

Let’s make a clear distinction : Coaches yelling or cussing out each other isn’t new, even if it’s still pretty rare. The best examples are Mike Krzyzewski and Roy Williams and Phil Jackson and Mike D’Antoni (see below video for laughs).

Rare as those may be, I wanted to focus on who is most likely to get in someone’s face on basketball principle. Kevin Young and Eric Musselman‘s beef in a 2011 D-League game is the closest thing we have on video to a Coughlin-Schiano dust-up, and it might be the only coach-on-coach feud the NBA sees for years.

Who are the NBA’s fieriest coaches? I tried to hazard a guess — don’t yell at me too hard if I got them wrong, coach.

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